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Maryland University of Integrative Health Announces Agreement with the American College of Healthcare Sciences

Participants In New Human Study Experience Short-Term Improved Vascular Function After Consuming Red Raspberries

Scientists Say Employee Burnout Is A Real Health Condition - New Study Reveals A Natural Way to Address Its Symptoms

Systematic Review Examines 25 Years of Evidence on the Role of Walnut Consumption on Cardiovascular Risk Factors

How does Parkinson's disease develop? Study raises doubts on theory of Parkinson's disease

Thomas Jefferson University Launches the Nation's Only University-Based Cannabis Science Graduate Certificate Programs to Prepare Healthcare and Industry Professionals for the Fast-Growing Field




Released: 07/19/18


Maryland University of Integrative Health Announces Agreement with the American College of Healthcare Sciences

LAUREL, Md., July 19, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Maryland University of Integrative Health (MUIH), a national leader in the education and practice of natural medicine, announced today that it has signed an articulation agreement with the American College of Healthcare Sciences (ACHS).

"This agreement reflects the shared commitment of MUIH and ACHS to integrative health and building the next generation of practitioners in the field," says Dr. Christina Sax, MUIH's provost and vice president for academic and student affairs.

The agreement provides an accelerated pathway to admission and advanced standing at MUIH for students who have successfully completed the B.S. in Integrative Health Sciences and B.S. in Nutrition degrees at ACHS. Such students are eligible for entry into MUIH's master's degree programs in acupuncture, Oriental medicine, health and wellness coaching, health promotion, therapeutic herbalism, and nutrition and integrative health, as well as post-baccalaureate certificate programs in various fields. The agreement also provides a pathway for MUIH students and graduates to transfer credit to ACHS and pursue a wide range of integrative health and wellness program including post-baccalaureate certificates in fields such as aromatherapy, botanical safety, and holistic health topics.  

"This agreement will open more doors for ACHS and MUIH students and future wellness practitioners to grow in their education, professional development, and personal holistic health journey," added Dorene Petersen, president and founder of ACHS.

About Maryland University of Integrative Health (MUIH)
Maryland University of Integrative Health is one of the nation's leading academic institutions for natural medicine. For nearly 40 years, MUIH has educated and informed practitioners and leaders in health and wellness through transformative and relationship-centered programs that draw from traditional wisdom and contemporary science. Progressive graduate degrees in a wide range of disciplines are offered both on campus and online. For more information, please visit www.muih.edu.

About the American College of Healthcare Sciences (ACHS)
For the past 40 years, ACHS has been fostering competence, professionalism, and cooperation in holistic healthcare and working to preserve and share knowledge in natural medicine through its online, on-campus, and study abroad integrative health and wellness programs. With undergraduate and graduate degrees, diplomas, certificates, and professional CEUs, ACHS makes integrative health education accessible to a diverse community of learners. For more information, please visit www.achs.edu.

Released: 07/19/18


Participants In New Human Study Experience Short-Term Improved Vascular Function After Consuming Red Raspberries

A recent randomized controlled trial, published in the Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, provides insights on the promising outcomes of short-term improvements in blood vessel function among healthy males who consumed dietary achievable amounts of red raspberries. The research was supported in part by funds from The National Processed Raspberry Council.

The subjects – ten healthy males aged 18 to 35 – consumed drinks prepared with 200g and 400g of frozen raspberries containing 201 or 403 mg of total polyphenols, or a matched control drink in terms of macro and micronutrient content, color, and taste.

Researchers investigated the vascular effects of the subjects at baseline, 2 hours-post consumption and 24 hours-post consumption of the raspberry and control test drinks. Participants consuming the red raspberry drink showed improved flow-mediated dilation (FMD), an established biomarker of cardiovascular disease risk. FMD increased significantly at 2 hours post-consumption of the raspberry drink when compared with the change in FMD due to the control drink, and this maintained at 24 hours after consumption.

At 2 hours post-consumption of both raspberry drinks, ellagic acid, found in plasma and urine correlated with FMD. At 24 hours post-consumption of the 200g raspberry drink, urolithin-A-3-glucuronide and urolithin-A-sulfate correlated with FMD. No significant differences were found between FMD improvements after consumption of the 200g and 400g raspberry drinks.

"The research study suggests that ellagitannins, a type of natural compounds present in red raspberries, may play a role in driving the positive effects seen on blood vessel function in the study's participants," commented Dr. Ana Rodriguez-Mateos, principal investigator and senior author of the study from the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine of King's College London.

"We're excited about these findings and what they may potentially add to the growing list of benefits from consuming red raspberries," commented Tom Krugman, Executive Director of the National Processed Raspberry Council (NPRC).

Further studies will need to show whether these results translate into long-term health benefits in the general population by looking at larger study groups over longer timeframes.

Released: 07/19/18


Scientists Say Employee Burnout Is A Real Health Condition - New Study Reveals A Natural Way to Address Its Symptoms

Experts say employee burnout is approaching epidemic levels. A recent survey by Yale University1 revealed that one-out-of-five highly engaged employees report feeling burnt out and a Kronos survey found that nearly half of HR leaders (46 percent) say employee burnout is responsible for up to 50 percent of their annual workforce turnover. In new peer-reviewed, published study researchers studying burnout found that daily supplementation with the natural antioxidant, Robuvit® (Ro-boo-vit) French oak wood extract can curb the symptoms of burnout, including fatigue, lower tolerance and lack of job satisfaction.

"Burnout is a real health condition – a state of physical, emotional or mental exhaustion – caused by a specific type of job-related stress. Millions feel burnout and it erodes their energy and the satisfaction they have with their work," said renowned natural health physician and author Dr. Fred Pescatore. "Burnout is a difficult condition to address and its symptoms can be frustrating. This study presents the natural antioxidant Robuvit® as a potential solution."

The study, published in Minerva Medica, shows that supplementing with Robuvit® daily can help alleviate feelings of workplace burnout by reducing fatigue and oxidative stress. The study tested 108 senior professionals and young surgeons who showed signs of workplace burnout.

Participants supplemented with 300 mg of Robuvit® daily for a duration of four weeks. Researchers found that participants who supplemented with Robuvit® had significant improvement of burnout symptoms like fatigue, dissatisfaction with work and negative attitude in the workplace.

The participant group of 22 young surgeons who supplemented with Robuvit® reported increased positive feelings at work as a result of their improved symptoms, including:

  • Improved feelings of being emotional drained (49 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. 5 percent control)
  • Alleviated fatigue substantially (43 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. 3 percent control)
  • Improved tolerance levels (45 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. 13 percent control)
  • Reduced feelings of strain from interactions (21 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. -2 percent control)
  • Improved feelings of satisfaction of career path (31 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. -3 percent control)

Similarly, the group of 46 senior professionals who supplemented with Robuvit® experienced improved symptoms as well:

  • Improved relationships with clients (10 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. -3 percent control)
  • Alleviated fatigue (27 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. 3 percent control)
  • Improved tolerance levels (35 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. 0 percent control)
  • Reduced feelings of strain from interactions (12 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. -21 percent control)
  • Improved feelings of satisfaction of career path (35 percent improvement with Robuvit® vs. -7 percent control)

Both groups experienced notable reduction of oxidative stress when they supplemented with Robuvit®, including an 11 percent reduction in the young surgeon group and 18.6 percent improvement in the senior professionals group, while control groups remained unchanged.

"Oxidative stress causes damage to healthy cells which can make you feel fatigued. This study shows that Robuvit®'s antioxidant properties cut down oxidative stress to effectively reduce burnout and its symptoms," said Dr. Pescatore.

Robuvit® French oak wood extract is a powerful natural antioxidant. Supplementation with Robuvit® is shown to develop Robuvit® metabolites which make energy-generating mitochondria much more efficient, delivering a noticeable and verifiable energy boost.  Robuvit® is shown to support detoxification and liver function and to boost energy in those with fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome. This research builds upon the studies showing Robuvit® 's benefits for natural energy and its antioxidant properties to combat oxidative stress.

To review clinical research and additional information on Robuvit®, visit www.robuvit.com.

Released: 07/19/18


Systematic Review Examines 25 Years of Evidence on the Role of Walnut Consumption on Cardiovascular Risk Factors

An updated systematic review from Harvard University examines 25 years of evidence for the role of walnut consumption on cardiovascular risk factors, including cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and weight.1 The original meta-analysis, "Effects of walnut consumption on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors: a meta-analysis and systematic review," was published in 2009 and reviewed 13 trials representing 365 individuals.2Researchers evaluated clinical trials that have published since then and released an updated review that now includes twice the number of trials and represents about three times the number of individuals, compared to the initial publication. Findings from the meta-analysis suggest that walnut-enriched diets may lead to significantly greater reductions in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B, compared to control diets.

"This updated review further strengthens the case that enjoying walnuts is a great (and tasty) way to add important nutrients to your diet while supporting the health of your heart," says Dr. Michael Roizen, Chief Wellness Officer of the Cleveland Clinic.

Researchers examined 26 randomized controlled trials representing 1059 participants (22-75 years old), including those with a variety of conditions such as high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, overweight or obesity, as well as those that were healthy. Walnut-enriched diets varied in amounts ranging from 5-24 percent of total calories per day (equivalent to 0.5-3.9 ounces per day) and were compared to control diets, including low-fat, Mediterranean, or a traditional American or Japanese diet. When compared to control diets, a diet supplemented with walnuts resulted in a significantly greater percent decrease in total cholesterol (3.25%), LDL cholesterol (3.73%), triglycerides (5.52%), and apolipoprotein B (4.19%). (Apolipoprotein B is the primary protein found in LDL cholesterol.) In addition, incorporating walnuts into the diet had no adverse effects on body weight or blood pressure, according to the studies included in the meta-analysis.

Walnuts have been investigated for their potential benefits on a variety of health outcomes, including cancer, gut health, diabetes, cognitive function, and male reproductive health, but the strongest evidence exists for cardiovascular benefits. Walnuts are recognized by the American Heart Association and U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a heart-healthy3 food, and there are a number of properties in walnuts that may be responsible for health benefits. Walnuts are a rich source of recommended polyunsaturated fat (13 grams per ounce), which includes an excellent source of the essential omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (2.5 grams per ounce). They also offer a variety of antioxidants (3.721 mmol/oz), including polyphenols (69.3 ± 16.5 μmol catechin equivalents/g) and gamma tocopherol (5.91 mg/ounce).4

As with any scientific research, some study limitations should be considered. Most of the trials in this review had relatively small sample sizes, which could limit the ability to determine significant effects. Additionally, in some cases, the amount of walnuts consumed in the trials was relatively large and might be difficult to maintain in a non-research setting. However, researchers still saw significant benefits when lower amounts of walnuts were consumed (less than 28 grams per day), particularly with total and LDL cholesterol.

Support for this research was provided through a grant from the California Walnut Commission (CWC). The CWC has been active in health-related research on walnuts for more than 25 years. While the CWC does provide funds and/or walnuts for various projects, the actual studies are conducted independently by researchers who design the experiments, interpret the results and write the manuscripts.

Released: 07/09/18


How does Parkinson's disease develop? Study raises doubts on theory of Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease was first described by a British doctor more than 200 years' ago. The exact causes of this neurodegenerative disease are still unknown. In a study recently published in eLife, a team of researchers led by Prof. Henning Stahlberg from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has now questioned the previous understanding of this disease.

The arms and legs tremble incessantly, the muscles become weaker and the movements slower ? these are typical symptoms that many Parkinson's patients suffer from. More than six million people are affected worldwide. In these patients, the dopamine-producing nerve cells in the brain slowly die off. The resulting lack of this neurotransmitter impairs motor function and often also affects the cognitive abilities.

Questionable: protein fibrils cause Parkinson's disease

So far, it was assumed that the protein alpha-synuclein is one of the trigger factors. This protein can clump together and form small needles, so-called fibrils, which accumulate and deposit as Lewy bodies in the nerve cells. These toxic fibrils damage the affected brain cells. A team of scientists led by Prof. Henning Stahlberg from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel, in collaboration with researchers from Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. and the ETH Zurich, have now artificially generated an alpha-synuclein fibril in the test tube. They have been able to visualize for the first time its three-dimensional structure with atomic resolution. "Contrary to our expectations, the results seem to raise more questions than they can hope to answer," says Stahlberg.

It is important to know that in some congenital forms of Parkinson's disease, affected persons carry genetic defects in the alpha-synuclein gene. These mutations, it is suspected, eventually cause the protein to fold incorrectly, thus forming dangerous fibrils. "However, our 3D structure reveals that a mutated alpha-synuclein protein should not be able to form these type of fibrils," says Stahlberg. "Because of their location, most of these mutations would rather hinder the formation of the fibril structure that we have found." In brief, if the fibril structure causes Parkinson's disease, the genetic defect would have to protect against the disease. But this is not the case. So, it could be possible that a different type of fibril or another form of the protein triggers the disease in these patients.

Study poses new questions

More investigations are now needed to understand this fibril structure. What are the effects of the alpha-synuclein mutations? Do they lead to distinct forms of protein aggregates? What is the role of the fibrils for the nerve cells, and why do these cells die? To date, the exact physiological function of alpha-synuclein is still not known. Since only the symptoms of this neurodegenerative disease can be alleviated with the current medications, new concepts are urgently needed.


Story Source: Materials provided by University of Basel.

Released: 07/09/18


Thomas Jefferson University Launches the Nation's Only University-Based Cannabis Science Graduate Certificate Programs to Prepare Healthcare and Industry Professionals for the Fast-Growing Field

With 30 states now allowing the use of medical marijuana, the multi-billion-dollar legal cannabis industry is projected to be one of the fastest-growing sectors of the U.S. economy in the next decade.

Until now, healthcare providers, researchers and industry professionals have found few credible, evidence-based educational options to learn about the health benefits and risks of cannabis in appropriate clinical settings to treat chronic pain and other conditions such as multiple sclerosis spasticity or epileptic seizures.  

To address this need, The Lambert Center for the Study of Medicinal Cannabis and Hemp at Thomas Jefferson University has created the nation's first—and only—university-based, graduate-level certificates in cannabis education for healthcare and industry professionals.

"With the ever-evolving legislative and regulatory environment, accumulating data and diverse political commentary on the topic of medical marijuana, there exists a vast knowledge gap," said Charles Pollack, MD, director of the Jefferson Institute of Emerging Health Professions and The Lambert Center. "Our goal at The Lambert Center is to help expand the knowledge base of scientists and clinicians—physicians of every specialty, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and pharmacists—and these new programs will help advance the knowledge and treatment around medicinal cannabis."

This fall, the Lambert Center will launch graduate certificates in Cannabis Medicine and Cannabinoid Pharmacology, both the first of their kind. In 2019, the Cannabinoid Chemistry and Toxicology Graduate Certificate will be launched.

Prescriptions for cannabis have not been written since 1937, when medical marijuana was made illegal. That means most practicing medical professionals have learned only about the drug's abuse potential and little about its clinical applications. It was only in the 1980s that scientists began to clarify the body's endocannabinoid system, which provides our current understanding of how cannabinoids may work in the treatment of various diseases. 

Still, many medical professionals today are hard-pressed to answer patient questions about the efficacy of cannabis products and the associated pros and cons, and Jefferson's new programs promise to fill the gap.

The Cannabis Medicine Certificate will target clinicians who want a higher level of knowledge about safe and appropriate medicinal cannabis to incorporate into their practices.  Pharmacological and pathologic concepts and current treatments of diseases for which cannabinoid compounds have been demonstrated to be therapeutic will be covered and supplemented with peer-reviewed research data on cannabis therapy as an adjunct or replacement for conventional therapy.  The program will also include a comprehensive review of the social, political and cultural landscape in which the current debates occur.

The Cannabinoid Pharmacology Certificate, targeting scientists and researchers, will explore the ways cannabis affects the human body as well as how the body metabolizes and excretes cannabis and cannabinoids.

The Cannabinoid Chemistry and Toxicology Certificate will give those working in regulation of the legal cannabis industry, as well as scientists, an understanding of cannabis botany and propagation, products and biological samples and principles of quality control for cannabis containing products.

All three certificate programs are offered in partnership with the Center for Forensic Science Research & Education(CFSRE) at the Fredric Rieders Family Foundation, which has been at the forefront of the forensic community, providing novel developments in research, training and education in the forensic sciences for more than 20 years.

Each year-long certificate program offers four three-credit academic courses focused on evidence-based medicine. Ten of the twelve graduate courses will be offered entirely online.  The Cannabinoid Chemistry and Toxicology Certificate requires two hybrid courses that include both in-person didactics and laboratory exercises at CSFRE's state-of-the-art research and teaching facility in Willow Grove, Pa.

The cannabis certificates are part of several new certificate programs from Jefferson's Institute of Emerging Health Professions, which endeavors to provide innovative and unique education and training to fill future career, training and certification gaps in healthcare practice and delivery.

Jefferson's Lambert Center for the Study of Medicinal Cannabis & Hemp is the nation's only comprehensive academic resource for education, research and practice pertaining to the potential use of cannabinoids as medical therapy.

For more information about the certificate programs, click here.

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